Category Archives: Misc Stories

LOST TIES

Armando Balifrank Onorati early 1950s and his oldest son Gary Steven Onorati, USMC, 1990.

Armando Balifrank Onorati, USA in the  early 1950s and his oldest son Gary Steven Onorati, USMC, 1990.

Facebook is an amazing and innovative tool… it helps you stay connected with family and friends near and far. You can share pictures with family members and watch each others children grow up without having to actually be close. You can keep track of loved ones stationed overseas or in war zones, keep up-to-date with what friends are up to, follow pages of interests, businesses you enjoy patronizing or causes you believe in. You have the ability to reach masses with one post, to stir emotions in strangers and to bring awareness and support to what’s important to you or even reconnect with lost family members. But even with all of its benefits in expanding communication and contact with people globally, Facebook, I believe has destroyed the art of communication between families.

How many of you use Facebook on a daily basis? How many of you stay signed into Facebook on a 24-hour basis? How many of you get text messages, tweets or some other forms of alert when there is a new post on your page, a response to a thread or conversation you are following or when someone instant messages you? How many are willing to be honest about how much time they spend on Facebook on a daily basis? Is it more than an hour? Several hours? The entire day?

I am guilty of all of the above.

Why do we do it? Because it’s easy and less personal. It takes less time to send a text message than it does to have an actual conversation. It’s less confrontational to send a blast to someone we’re upset with than to face them face-to-face. It’s easier to be brave behind the anonymity of a computer screen than to face someone in person. It’s easier to share information than it is to share feelings.

Facebook told me my oldest son got married. Or rather, my Auntie did, after she read about it on Facebook and she was living in Florida. My son and his now wife were living with me in my home in Tennessee. But Facebook also allowed me to keep in touch with my brother almost on a daily basis while he was stationed in Iraq for two years. Facebook also informed me when he returned home, got married to a new wife and no longer needed my support.

Tonight, Facebook informed me of the passing of my father-in-law,  Armando Balifrank Onorati, a man I had met only in passing in 2001. Facebook told me that my father-in-law died just a few hours ago at age 81, and even though I had never talked to him, I feel a loss. I feel sad that I never had the opportunity to get to know the man who was responsible for the birth of the man I have been in love with for more than 27 years. I feel pain that my sons’ grandfather never got to meet them, to talk to them or to see the wonderful job that his son did with raising his grandsons. I feel sad that this man, the reason my children exist at all, never knew he had a great-grandson who lives to carry on his name. I feel pain that my husband and my sons will not know first hand of the legacy and the history of the Onorati name. I feel sad and I cry tonight with the knowledge that an opportunity has been forever lost, a treasure has been stolen and for all its benefits, after being estranged for more than 45 years, even Facebook couldn’t bring a family back together.


A Christmas Gift

First of all Happy New Year! Tonight to celebrate, I decided to research a small Bible I had acquired and am ashamed to discover it has been 11 months since I have written… don’t know what I have been doing… well, yes, I do know. Living life but I have no idea where 2012 went and now we’re at 2013. My New Year’s resolution is to write at a minimum ONCE PER WEEK!  Okay, now on to my historical hunt and story for today.

With love from Mother

I love to purchase old items that I find with names in them. I enjoy researching the names and trying to discover who the previous owners were and to learn a small semblance of what their lives may have been like. After I’ve figure out a bit about their lives, I try to find current family members and work to reunited the items with the original owner’s family.

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Tonight, to start off the new year, I researched the name of Miss Fannie I. Elliott, the name I found written in a small bible I discovered in a local antique store. On the facing page of the cover was the inscription, “Fannie I. Elliott A Christmas gift from her mother. Dec. 25th, 1884” I wanted to find out who Fannie I. Elliott and her mother were.

bibleThe book was with a batch of items that came from Ohio, so when I entered Fannie’s name into Ancestry.com’s search engine, I felt pretty good when the name appeared in Dover, Cuyahoga, Ohio. I was even more convince I had the right person after checking and linking other possible connections and family trees.

New Beginnings

Fannie Idella Elliott was born on Feb. 21, 1866 in Cuyahoga County, Ohio to William George Elliott (Dec. 16, 1824 – Nov. 7, 1897) and Louisa Parfitt (May 5, 1825 – June 4, 1900). She was either the eighth or ninth child born to the couple, as she was a twin. Her sister was named Anna Luella. Her parents were both born in England. I discovered a christening record for her father for Jan. 2, 1825 in East Knoyle, Wiltshire, England naming him as the son of Jacob Elliot and Susanna and one for her mother, the daughter of James Parfitt and Mary, christened on 26 Jun 1825 in Bruton, Somerset, England.

Family genealogy trees located on the web all purported that Fannie’s parents were married in Dover, Cuyahoga, Ohio on Sept. 16, 1847, but while researching each of their 10 children, the oldest, Frank Riddle Elliot, is reported to have been born in England according to both his death certificate and christening registration, although the name on the christening registration lists his name as Riddle Frank Elliot, christened on Dec. 10, 1848 at Brewham, Somerset, England to William and Louisa. This could mean a couple of things… the family history trees have the marriage location wrong, the family traveled back to their home country and the babe was born in England while on the visit or Frank was born in England before they left but his parents weren’t married and they lied on the christening registration, and quite possibly, that could be why they left England.

William and Louisa, in addition to the twins and Frank (Nov. 6, 1848-Oct. 7, 1909), were the parents of James John Elliot (Jan. 18, 1850 – June 6, 1931), Sarah M. (1853-1932), Fred (1855-1930), Lettia Louisa (1858-1943), Thomas Henry (abt 1860 – ?), Gilbert Willson (July 5, 1863 – May 21, 1946) and Walter Edward (Sept. 1, 1868-Oct.1, 1951).

1860UnitedStatesFederalCensus_300638096

1860 federal census showing William Elliot and his family

On June 8, 1860, the census taker recorded William Elliot and his wife Louisa were living in Dover, Cuyahoga, Ohio with their children Frank, 11; James, 9; Sarah, 7; Fred, 5 and Lettie, 2. All the children, including Frank, were listed as being born in Ohio.

1870UnitedStatesFederalCensus

The 1870 census taken in Cuyahoga County, Ohio

The 1870 census shows the reality of the times of the building of America. Each family listed on the census form along with the Elliot family was an immigrant family, with every head of household affirming they were born in England, Germany or France. The ninth US census shows the family still living in Dover, Cuyahoga, Ohio but with additional children. Living in the home are William, 47 and his wife Louisa, 45; son Frank, 21, whose birth, along with his parents, are listed as in England, James, 19; Sarah, 17; Fred, 14; Lettie, 12; Henry, 9; Gilbert, 6; twins Anna and Fanny, 4 and one-year old Walter. William, as a farmer, was able to give his family a comfortable living as evidenced by the value of his real estate, $7,300 and his personal estate was valued at $1,00.

William Elliott and family in 1880 Federal Census Cuyahoga County, Ohio

William Elliott and family in 1880 Federal Census Cuyahoga County, Ohio

According to the 1880 US Federal Census, the Elliott family was living in North Olmsted, Cuyahoga, Ohio. William and Louisa are both 55 years of age and living at home were James J., 29; Thomas H. 19; Gilbert W. 16; Anna L. 14; Fannie I. 14 and Walter aged 11.

When Fannie was 18 she was given the bible, a copy of the New Testament published by the American Bible Society in 1872, on Dec. 25, 1884 according to the inscription written by her mother. I’m going to assume that since she was a twin, her mother Louisa, probably gave her sister Anne a bible as well. The bible’s pages are in remarkable condition, considering its 141 years, and unfortunately, I believe that’s from its lack of use.

BibleLeaf

A New Generation

By the time Christmas rolled around the following year, Fannie had become the bride of Walter R. Keyes (1864-Jan. 9, 1938) at the age of 19. They married on Dec. 24, 1885 in Rockport Township, Cuyahoga, Ohio. There is a notation on the marriage certificate that the consent can be found on doc. no. N, No. 1 file. Walter Keyes is the son of James H. Keyes from Gloucester, England and Martha J. Wilde of Scotland.

Marriage certificate for Fannie Elliott and Walter Keyes

Marriage certificate for Fannie Elliott and Walter Keyes

The young couple started their family with the birth of a daughter, Luella M. (1887-1947). A second daughter, Alta Keyes, was born on Aug. 12, 1888 in Rockport, Cuyahoga, Ohio and died before she was two. A son, Howard, was born on 1891, followed by Ada R. (1894-1936); Walter J. (1897-1980); Melvin (1900-1980) and baby Everest who was born in 1902 and died the following year.

1900UnitedStatesFederalCensusWalter was a hardware clerk in 1900 and the family lived in Rocky River, Cuyahoga. The 1900 federal census shows that Walter and Fannie had been married for 15 years and she was the mother of six children, with five of them living. The family had a 25-year old servant living with them named William E. Baker.

In 1910, the family is still living in Rocky River, Ohio next to Walter’s younger brother Edward and his family. Walter and Fannie were now 45 and 44 years of age respectively and had recorded on the census as having another child who had been born and died. Walter was listed as a hardware merchant, son Howard was a salesperson, working alongside his father and 16-year old daughter Ada/Ida was a bookkeeper for a local coal company.

Fannie and Walter Keyes in 1910

Fannie and Walter Keyes in 1910

Fannie and Walter were present at the weddings of their children, including Howard, who married Alma L. Mireau on June 3, 1912 and Ada, who became the bride of Arthur H. Hoag on Aug. 9, 1917.

The 1920 census shows the family living on Chapel Road in Madison Township, Lake County, Ohio. Only Walter, Fannie and their youngest son Walter, 21, are living in the home. In 1920, Walter has left the hardware business and lists his occupation as farmer and the son is a bank teller. The family is doing well and own their home free and clear.

Walter & Fannie living alone in 1930

Walter & Fannie living alone in 1930

The 1930 census shows that Walter and Fannie are in their mid-60s and are living alone back in Cuyahoga County. Walter is no longer working and they also own this home, located at 194 Loraine St., free and clear.

Although I have been able to locate the death certificate numbers for Fannie and Walter, I have been unable to find a copy of their actual certificates. Fannie I. Elliot Keyes died on July 5, 1932 at the age of 66. Walter passes a few years later on Jan. 9, 1938 at the age of 74. Fannie’s twin sister, Anna Luella married Bertrand H. Perrin and died on Oct. 16, 1938 in Geneva, Ashtabula, Ohio.

Death certificate of Anna Luella Elliott Perrin, twin sister of Fanny Idella Elliott Keyes.

Death certificate of Anna Luella Elliott Perrin, twin sister of Fanny Idella Elliott Keyes.


In awe of the past

I have been spending the past 10 days on a dream vacation…. a week of research at the world’s largest genealogical library – The Family History Library in Salt Lake City. It’s been a week with no children, no husband, no work (well, almost… I still wrote a couple of stories for this week’s Leader), and almost no school (online classes ;-))

And even with that little bit of work and school I had to do, I have had an AMAZING week! Ten to 12 hours a day of researching, give or take an hour depending on if I remembered to stop to eat. I have scoured through books written in the mid-1800s, examined Internet resources which made available documents and newspapers from all over the world from the past four centuries and my favorite – microfilms documenting marriages, births, deaths, military service and censuses, some as early as 1712! This trip I have visited Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, India, Switzerland and England, all without leaving the warmth of the library.

There is something about being able to view an original document which exists as testament to the life of your ancestors. On my last trip in July, I located the 1827 marriage certificate of my 4th great-grandparents, William and Celinda Court Brown and the 1844 marriage certificate of my 3rd great-grandparents, Francis and Celinda Brown Clough from BOMBAY, INDIA… Talk about an amazing feeling! This time, I found banns (wedding announcements) and death notices written in French from my PANCHAUD line in Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland from 1712… pouvez-vous dire merveilleux?

Death certificate of Jean Francois Panchaud

Death certificate of Mary Roberts

Death certificate of 11 month-old Mary Roberts

I also found the death records of my great-great-grandmother’s first husband and their daughter, my great-great-great-great auntie, who both died in Bombay, India in 1869, just five months apart from each other. Her husband of less than two years, Robert Clifton Roberts was 34 years old and died from an abscessed wound. He was thought of very highly in his community and the local newspaper, The Times of India, reported on Mar. 1, 1869 that his death was sincerely regretted. My 11-month-old auntie, Mary Roberts, died from convulsions. Finding their death notices helped explain why my great-great grandmother left her home and her family and traveled thousands of miles to England in the 1870s after spending her entire life in India. I can imagine how distraught she must have been to have lost her husband and baby within months of each other. She probably was trying to get away from the place that held so much pain for her, even though it was the place of her birth. But at the same time, even though I feel sadness at their passing and what could have been, when I look at those records I can’t help but think if they hadn’t died, I would not be here today. Because it was their deaths that drove my gggrandmother to England where she met my gggrandfather, and in turn, begat my line.

I also learned some American history this week. I located a census of the Indiana Territory for 1807 which listed every free white man living in the territory before it was a state. There was only 616 names on the list! I find that simply incredible that I have a document in my hands that list every single person living in the state of Indiana, before it was a state, and there’s just over 600 names on the list! My sixth-great grandfather, Alexander Guard and two of his sons, David (my 5th great grandfather) and Timothy were listed on the census. They had traveled from New Jersey with their families after the Revolutionary War by following the Ohio River, arriving at North Bend, Ohio in the spring of 1790 and moved to, what is now Dearborn County, Ind. in 1796.

There is so much history to be learned by digging up the past – The history of our ancestors and of our descendants. The reason we are here and the path we are taking. Genealogy is the map to discovering our history. Give it a try and learn the stories of your past.


A new year for renewed energy

Isn’t is amazing how everyday life seems to get in the way of, well, everyday life? You have good intentions to accomplish something and then something else steps in the way and the first task becomes an afterthought. Well, no more. This year will be different.

When I started back to work, it was to have a bit more money available to help out my children who were starting to live life on their own. To be able to help out with unexpected expenses or to meet their needs which they might not be able to meet on their own. And the extra funds have come in handy. My oldest and his wife have welcomed a new son; my first grandchild and my daughter-in-law and the baby have moved in with my husband and I while her husband is serving in Kuwait. The extra money has definitely come in handy… I have a new grandson I feel the need to spoil and with the extra bodies at the house, utilities and other necessities have increased as well.

But, it’s come at a price; a hefty price. I have to readjust myself, reschedule my time, reorganize my life and re-prioritize my goals to make everything meet at the proper adjoining crossroads. The point where I accomplish and meet my responsibilities and obligations but at the same time leave a bit of breathing room for myself – to find time to re-energize myself, to accomplish the goals I have laid out and time to just do something for me.

This year WILL be different.

This year, I WILL concentrate on my schooling and finish my classes on time.

This year, I WILL work on the mystery of the murders of my family members who have waited for more than 70 years for their story to be told.

This year, I WILL work on my genealogy and family trees; to research, answer questions and connect missing pieces.

This year, I WILL blog more often and document the untold stories of those I uncover.

This year, I WILL accomplish my New Year’s resolution of helping at least 12 people and organizations, both through my time and money.

This this year, I WILL take time for myself; to do the things that I love to do. To help the people I love and those I don’t know.

And this year, I WILL have a life worth living and not just live a life.

This year, I WILL take the time to do more for me

 

 


A Child of the World

American has long been considered a melting pot, a place for people of all religions, cultures and races to live in freedom. And because America was founded by immigrants, when researching their genealogy, many Americans will find ancestors from around the world.

I am no different… well, maybe a little.

On my mother’s side, a few of my ancestors have been in this country since the mid-1700s. A good many of them came to America in the mid-1800s looking for a new way of life for their families. And some have been here since the beginning. My maternal ancestors give my life a blend of Native American, English and German roots and I feel blessed to have their blood running through my veins.

On my father’s side I am truly a child of the world. I am half Bermudian and half American. My father was born in Bermuda, as was his father. My grandfather’s brother, my great-uncle, and his family lives in Canada. My great-grandfather was born in England and his father, my great-great grandfather from Lausanne, Switzerland and his grandfather from France. My GGGrandfather’s  seven children were born in England, Italy and South Africa. His wife, my GGGrandmother was born in Bombay, India in 1846 during the height of the East India Company and died in Dimboola, Australia in 1906. My father’s mother was also born in Bermuda, but her both her parents immigrated to Bermuda from the Azores. Their parents, my great-great grandparents stayed on Pico and Sao Miguel, Azores.

On my mother’s side, I am the 7th generation to be born in the U.S. But on my father’s side I am the first generation born in America. I love exploring my heritage and finding the connections that bridge my families and navigates my path down the winding road I call my life.


MIA: LCDR Michael Lora Bouchard, USN

Since this is Memorial Day, it seems appropriate to tell this story. When I first joined the Navy at age 18, I was given a MIA bracelet by my sea “daddy,” a senior chief who took me under his wing and taught me the ways of the Navy during those early years. I’m not positive if he actually knew the man on my bracelet but I have a feeling he did. Senior had already been in the Navy for 45 years when I met him and I believe by passing on his bracelet, he hoped to inspire a new generation to carry on and think about those who were lost in the jungles of Vietnam.

The name on my bracelet is LCDR Michael L. Bouchard and for probably my first 17 years in the Navy I wore his bracelet every day. I’d think about him each time my gaze would see his name on my wrist. When I visited Washington, DC and the Vietnam Memorial, I would seek out his name on the black granite stone and trace his name with my fingers.  His name is located on panel 36W, line 48. I stopped wearing the bracelet about the time I went to sea in 2001, I don’t remember why, probably because of the machinery on the ship, but I kept it in my coffin rack among my prized possessions. I thought about Michael again today and had to go find my old friend and research a bit about him.

Unfortunately, I don’t know a lot about LCDR Bouchard when he was younger, he was born after the 1930 census was released and new information about him and his family won’t be available until the release of the 1940 census in April 2012. What I do know is he was born on November 1, 1938 in Missoula, Montana to a Roman Catholic family. He attended the Bonner Elementary School and then Missoula High School, graduating about 1956. After high school he married, had four children, three daughters and a son and joined the United States Navy. Mike became a pilot and in 1962, he was stationed on board the USS Midway (CV-41) as a Lieutenant Junior Grade (LTjg). He was divorced by 1966, as his youngest daughter recalls being 3 years old when her parents separated and 5 years old when he was classified as missing in action.

In 1968, he was attached to Attack Squadron 196 (VA-196), deployed on board the USS Constellation (CV-64). This is what the Navy has released about his mission:

“On the night of 19/20 Dec 1968, LT Michael L. Bouchard, pilot, and LT Robert W. Colyar, bombardier-navigator, launched from USS CONSTELLATION in A-6A BuNo 154152 for a strike mission in Laos. Upon arrival in the area they were assigned to a Forward Air Controller working a truck park on the Ho Chi Minh Trail near the village of Ban Tanook, about 20 miles southwest of the A Shau Valley.
Bouchard was to make visual dive-bombing runs by the light of parachute flares. Once cleared by the FAC, he rolled in but as his aircraft was passing through 5500 feet and at an airspeed of about 500 knots the A-6 was hit by AAA fire, separating the starboard wing from the fuselage. Other aircrew in the area saw only one parachute, which turned out to be Colyar’s. Once on the ground, Colyar spent about 30 minutes searching for Bouchard but then was forced to leave the area to avoid capture. He was picked up the next day by an Air Force helicopter.
LT Bouchard was classed as Missing in Action and was carried in that status until 26 Nov 1973, when the Secretary of the Navy approved a Presumptive Finding of Death. He was promoted to Lieutenant Commander while MIA. LCDR Bouchard’s remains have not been repatriated.”

Michael was very much loved and missed. I’ve come across emails from his daughters asking for information and memories of their father and I’ve also found the following memories written by former friends in my search:

Hello,
My name is Alphie Liming and I grew up Missoula, MT. Mike grew up in a very small lumber mill “company” town, Bonner, about 7 or 8 miles from Missoula. My grandmother taught him in the second grade at Bonner Elementary School. Mike was one year ahead of me in school, and the following year my grandma taught me in the 2nd grade. That’s when I got to know Mike.
 
We sort of lost touch until high school, but because there wasn’t a high school in Bonner Mike had to come to Missoula to school. We became reaquainted and subsequently went steady in high school. An extremely bright and personable young man, he was very popular, being Student Body President, as well as State Study Body President. (I always thought he would go on to be a politician.)
 
He graduated in 1956 and went to Oregon State University on an NROTC Scholarship and was a Sigma Chi. I had been accepted to go to OSC as well, but as things happen sometimes, we parted ways (still very good friends) and I went to USC.
 
The last time I saw Mike was in 1961. He came to visit me and my husband, who was also a Navy officer, in San Diego. I know that he was married and believe had 3 children, but subsequently divorced.
I’ve heard that he had been accepted to the Blue Angels just before he was shot down, supposedly on one of his last missions. We’ve seen photos on TV taken in a POW camp in North Vietnam a year or so after he was shot down that many of us felt were pictures of him eating (he was left-handed as I am).
Mike was an admirable person and I know would have gone far had not his life been cut so short.
 
From a childhood friend,
Alphie Liming
 

I rememember when I was 10 years old, my dad talking to Mike’s father on the phone, listening … just being there for him. Sometimes the calls were late at night and when my dad would hang up he would break down and cry. This strong man who had served in WWII would collapse into the sorrow and loss he felt for his friend, who would never know the truth about what happened to his son after that plane went down. I have memories of there being a news story that showed some POW’s in captivity and how one young man resembled Mike, and my parents thinking there might still be hope of his returning. Sadly, that was not the case. Mike’s leather jacket still hangs in Bonner Grade School where he, and later I, attended. I didn’t know him, but I’ll never forget him. I’ll never forget my dad’s tears, or the heartbreak the whole community felt. God bless Mike, his family and friends, and all the brave men and women who never made it home.

Kathy Teague

Rest in Peace

Lieutenant Commander Michael Lora Bouchard

Nov. 1, 1938 – Nov. 26, 1973


The Wolfinger Brothers

William Penn and Herman Wolfinger mid-1880s

Found this pair of attractive young men in a local antique shop waiting to be taken home. The names scrawled on the back are W.P. and H. Wolfinger and they appear to be brothers to me. The picture, taken about 1885, was taken in San Francisco by William Shew (1820-1903), a fairly well-known photographer whose story was told previously.

At first glance, I am drawn to the casual stance of the young man on the left, leaning on the column. He looks completely comfortable while his brother on the right is trying very hard to appear distinguished, using a popular pose for gentlemen of the day. Some folks believe it was an imitation of Napoleon’s  famous pose but in reality people had a hard time keeping still while waiting during the long exposure times. For those who had trouble keeping their hands still, they held them inside their coats. This was to prevent the picture from being blurred in case they moved their hands during the exposure time. The long exposure times are also why it appears as if our ancestors were permanently depressed in their photographs. They weren’t depressed, it was just easier to hold a relaxed face then a constantly smiling one. You try smiling for 15 minutes…. I bet your jaws will be aching  afterwards!

They were brothers and both were born in Pennsylvania to Mary Wolfinger. Their father’s name is currently unknown as it appears he died soon after William was born. The 1860 US Federal Census shows the boys living with their 30-year-old mother and 10-year-old sister Louisa in Pennsylvania. Herman was 8 and William Penn was 7. The mother’s  birthplace is listed as Baden, which confirms later census reports.

It appears young William caught the gold fever rush. In 1870, at the age of 17, William is listed as Penn Wolfinger and is found living in Little York Township in the county of Nevada, California on his own. He is living in a hotel ran by Peter Drunzer and his wife, Mary, and his occupation is recorded as a miner.  Nevada County was the home of the second-largest gold-mining district in California. First discovered in 1850, for the next 100 years, the county produced over 68.4 tonnes of gold.

Born in February 1852, 28-year-old Herman, a cabinet maker, was residing in San Francisco, California along with his 24-year-old wife Julia, a long way away from her home state of New York in 1880. Also living in the home were son Herman M. Wolfinger, aged 4 and Julia’s mother, 60-year-old Catherine Smucker and her 27-year-old sister, also named Catherine. By 1880, William, who was born in May 1853, seems to have given up on prospecting and is living in the home of his sister and brother-in-law, Louisa and Theodore Erdin, in San Francisco, along with their four young daughters, Emma 8, Mary 6, Clara 4 and Julia 1. His occupation is listed as a cabinet maker.

In 1900,  at the age of 47, William was married to a 27-year-old Irish wife named Georgina. They had four children living at home – stepdaughter Margaret Stelling 7, daughter Eva 15, son Fred 13 and 11-year-old Elsie. He was still a cabinet maker and worked at Sterling Furniture Co., located at 1107 Treat Ave. and did quite well for himself. The company made educational furniture, such as the combination school desk and chair. The family was living at 5 Oak St., San Francisco, CA. Herman was living close by his brother at 786 1/2 Stevenson St. in a 3-storey flat. Herman was a widower, living with his children Herman M. 23, Raymond E. 16, Ethel T. 18 and Mabel J. 14.

Between 1900 and 1925, Herman and William moved residences quite a bit. One wonders if perhaps cabinet making wasn’t as lucrative as they had hoped. In 1904, Herman was living in room 13 on the 3rd floor of 100 Jones. In 1905, Herman marries again, a fellow Pennsylvanian named Bertha L.  and they are living at 152 Church Street in 1907. This is the second marriage for them both. William was living at 571 Duboce Ave in 1907. In 1912, records find William Penn living at 1751 Market Street. In 1916, he had moved once again to 20 12th Street. In 1923, he’s shown living at 2242 22nd Ave., still working as a cabinet maker.

In 1910, the federal census finds 58-year-old Herman and his wife of five years, living in Beaverdam, Hanover, Virginia. He has given up cabinet making and is recorded as working a home farm that he proudly owns. His 38-year0old wife, Bertha, tends to the home.

William Penn, 56, is living with his 23-year-old son Frederick at 1752 Market Street, which appears to be a boarding house in San Francisco. Both William and Frederick are listed as married, not widowed, but their wives are not recorded as living with them. The son doesn’t have an occupation listed but William is identified as a carpenter for the telephone service company.

Probably feeling lost without his old trade, 1920 finds Herman listed once again as a cabinet maker. At 67, he works from home to provide for his wife of 15 years. They are still living at their farm in Beaverdam, Va.

In 1920 William and Georgina, 66 and 47 years-old respectiviely, are living next to their son Frederick W., who also became a cabinet maker, and his family.  Fred is married to Catherine, and has two sons, William F., 9 and Raymond, 6 and a 4-year-old daughter, Delores.

William  and his wife, Georgina, are shown on the San Diego County voter registration list for 1940. His occupation is still listed as cabinet maker, although by now, William would be 86 years-old. They are living at 1874 O’Ferrell St.

Although, I haven’t found out exactly when they died, it is deduced that Herman Wolfinger dies sometime between 1920 and 1930 and William Penn Wolfinger dies after 1940.


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